CLL Alternatives

CLL The Cure is in the Grocery Store

Posted by: Denise on: October 5, 2018

Farmer's Market for CLL

Shopping for a future pickle at our local Farmer’s Market.

Last night my husband and I had what we call “fast food” for dinner. Don’t raise your eyebrows; it’s not what you think. I tend to cook an elaborate dinner, in quantity suitable for leftovers, about three times a week. After that, we either eat leftovers combined with freshly steamed vegetables or a raw salad, or we make “fast food.” In this case, it was slow-fried eggs, corn on the cob, and steamed brussels sprouts.

Why is this fast? Dinner took considerably less than a half hour, and it was delicious! Before I get into recipes or cooking techniques (like what is “slow-fried”?) I need to make another point. Success in the kitchen, as measured by truly healthy and nutritious meals and snacks that taste good, require more than kitchen skills. They require shopping!

Shopping Time!

Yes, if you want to beat this CLL thing, and you want to do it naturally, you have to spend some time in the supermarket and, if available, your local farmer’s market. This is another case of failing to plan is planning to fail. You have to shop the stores in your neighborhood until you find the best places for abundant organic fruit and vegetables. Yes, I do eat eggs, chicken, fish, and sometimes even beef, but I still eat a plant-based diet. The animal protein is more of a side dish.

Times have changed.

It wasn’t long ago that I had to go to health food stores for a fairly limited and often dried-out selection of fresh veggies. Today, even the corporate behemoths (like Kroger, here in SE Michigan) have an impressively well-stocked organic produce section. My personal choices these days are Kroger, Trader Joe’s, and the local Royal Oak farmer’s market. They all have their good and bad points. We (hubby and I) often go to two markets in one evening for a quick, targeted shopping trip. We know each store’s layout and can get in and out quickly. Even with these quick  trips, keep in mind that you will likely have to do this at least twice a week. Some vegetables keep only so long, and if you’re doing it right you’ll find that your refrigerator has an ever-dwindling selection of fresh produce

Another time saver is stopping in on the way home. Hubby does this more than me, especially in the summer, as I take my dog, Tina, to work, and I don’t like to leave her in the car unless it’s cold outside. (It’s cold outside today now…sigh.)

Another side note: sometimes your organic produce choice won’t look so good. Sometimes conventional might be a better choice, in which case please soak in 50-50 white vinegar and water to cleanse as much pesticide residue as possible. Another choice to shop more than one market. If the selection at the first isn’t so good, you still have one more chance to get your organics.

And where do I buy all my animal protein?

This is not an answer set in stone. We still buy eggs from our local farmer’s market. They are consistently better than the organic eggs at any supermarket. The yokes are orange rather than yellow, and they are delicious! In the past my meat sources have been Trader Joe’s, Whole Foods, farmer’s market, other specialty stores. You have to continually be aware and look for the best places. Your local Weston A Price chapter can help you source local good foods.

The point is to BE PREPARED.

Shop ahead and get the best organic veggies and fruits in season. You can rinse and freeze the fruit. Store the leafy greens and other veggies in a loosely closed plastic bag so that some air can get in. This works for me, and it’s fairly simple. Simple is good. The more complicated you make your food gathering, the more of a task it will seem.

Of course, it’s not all about veggies and fruit. Also keep stocked with organic pastured free-range chicken and grass-fed pastured beef, wild caught white fish and salmon, and pastured free-range eggs. An extra freezer is wonderful, if you can afford it. Beyond that are the seasonings and sauces. I’m honestly not the most skilled cook, but I do keep tapioca starch (flour) on hand for mixing with water and seasonings and pouring over a stir fry when almost done. It turns into a delightful gravy reminiscent of a Chinese food dish.

Also keep organic, extra-virgin olive oil in the cupboard, along with apple cider vinegar, other vinegars (I love Eden-brand umi-plum…yum!) and balsamic vinegar as well. (all organic, please) A supply of fresh lemon is great  to add to dressings and sauces, and also to squeeze into a morning glass of water for your alkalinity and digestion.

Coming soon to a blog near you!

In another post soon, I will write about some of my favorite cooking techniques. Not only should your vegetables be organic and fresh, and your animal protein free-range, organic and pastured, but nothing should be over cooked at temperatures above 300-degrees Fahrenheit.  This is a challenge I’ve managed to overcome by checking out advice on Google and youtube, and by experimenting on my own. I am happy to share and will do so soon.

In the meantime, get out to your local market and start checking out the best sources and prices. You’re in this for the long haul. As environmental doctor Sherry Rogers wrote, “The Cure is in the Kitchen.” I would add, in order for that to happen you have to get to your grocery store first!

Happy shopping! – Denise

PS A good cancer cookbook is The Cancer Fighting Kitchen. There is an earlier addition at a greatly reduced cost on Amazon.

 

5 Responses to "CLL The Cure is in the Grocery Store"

Hi Denise!

How have you been keeping? Just to let you know that the blood report wasn’t that great but it wasn’t terrible either. Life goes on.

I have a couple of questions for you. If I remember correctly, you had once mentioned about a lump on your neck. Did it disappear? If not, has it changed in any fashion ie increased or decreased? What had your oncologist to say about it if anything?

As the wbc count increases albeit slowly, I have been exploring all possibilities. So, your response will be appreciated.

Kind regards.

Hi Vin,
Good to hear from you! I’m doing okay. I’m due for a blood test this week, but putting it off because I’ve been coming down with a cold and that can skew the numbers. (taking extra zinc and garlic and it’s working, but still…) I will answer your questions.

1. I do have a minor “lump” on the left side of my neck. I’ve noticed it since 2005. The doctor was unimpressed, although he said it was a large CLL node. Thankfully, it hasn’t changed, as in it hasn’t gotten larger. It sort of shows if I look for it, but I don’t think anyone would notice it if I didn’t make an issue of it. What is more concerning to me are my perpetually swollen glands under the chin, I believe the salivary glands. They are visible, but they have been for decades, predating the CLL. When I am stressed, ill, overtired, etc., they swell further causing pain. Generally, an early trip to bed with a good book and an even better night’s sleep is my personal cure. It is also “not a big deal.” It used to worry me, but over time I’ve learned to live with it. The important thing is that I don’t consider it to be a sign of impending doom. 🙂

2. How much has your WBC increased? And how is your RBC (red count)? I used to have a high WBC (still do, actually, just not quite as high) and a low RBC. “They” say not to take iron, as iron feeds cancer. However, my ferritin scores were also low, so I started taking iron for the ferritin, the RBC, and (drumroll) to help with my thinning hair. I was doing so many things at that time that I dont’ know for sure what the cause was, but my RBC finally went up while my WBC stayed steady (and eventually went down).

I’m not saying this will be the answer for you. But…perhaps work on your general health and try to “fix” other things that you can with other supplements. It might improve things and help to lower your WBC.

To recap what I believe has worked for me to lower WBC…
Peak Immune
cooking low and slow (nothing over 300 degrees, and NEVER eat burnt)
Optimize your vitamin D — take 10,000 IU/day and keep getting tested. Lower it when it approaches 100. I take 9000 IU daily at this time.

Other things I did at the time of the WBC dropping:
Moved from our bedroom with high EMFs to a room in the front of the house.
Had had dental revision (mercury fillings and root canal removed) a few years earlier. Did this help? Not sure.
Are you nontoxic in house cleaning and in personal care products?

Also, review the Nasha Winters book, “The Metabolic Approach to Cancer”
Consider consulting with her or with the co-author of the book, who also works with clients.

If the climb is slow, I would not lose sleep over it. However, you are right to keep exploring possibilities.

Please keep in touch, let me know what you decide to do and if it works (this helps other lurkers here).
Wishing you the very best of health,
Denise

Dear Denise, Thank you so much for your prompt and so detailed response. You are blessed to be so caring. I will try to answer questions you ask.

Except that I get very tired I have no other symptom whatsoever. And, the oncologist does not think that cll is the cause of the tiredness. I do not disagree with him.

WBC count is 24.1 and RBC is 4.77. In 6 months WBC has increased from 20.6 to 24.1. At this stage I am not worried but I have become more alert as the count has been consistently increasing.

Mostly I eat food cooked below 300 deg F. I do take D3 though a lower dose. I got tested in June and it was 103. I also take a heavy dose of mushrooms (AHCC) with some breaks. Unfortunately the air I breathe is not the highest quality. I am sot sure what I can do to change that, presently. I did purchase the book you mention. Skimmed though it but never read it properly. I will. BTW I do not have any cavity. In general I am not that fond of going to doctors or dentists.

I will certainly keep you informed. Keep up the good work, beautiful lady.

Regards.

vin

Dear Denise, Thank you so much for your prompt and so detailed response. You are blessed to be so caring. I will try to answer questions you ask.

Except that I get very tired I have no other symptom whatsoever. And, the oncologist does not think that cll is the cause of the tiredness. I do not disagree with him.

WBC count is 24.1 and RBC is 4.77. In 6 months WBC has increased from 20.6 to 24.1. At this stage I am not worried but I have become more alert as the count has been consistently increasing.

Mostly I eat food cooked below 300 deg F. I do take D3 though a lower dose. I got tested in June and it was 103. I also take a heavy dose of mushrooms (AHCC) with some breaks. Unfortunately the air I breathe is not the highest quality. I am sot sure what I can do to change that, presently. I did purchase the book you mention. Skimmed though it but never read it properly. I will. BTW I do not have any cavity. In general I am not that fond of going to doctors or dentists.

I will certainly keep you informed. Keep up the good work, beautiful lady.

Regards.

vin

Hi Vin,
I agree with you and the doc, you are probably tired for other reasons. B12? More uninterrupted sleep? Glad you have no symptoms; that is a good thing! Your change in WBC is like a burp. It would be nice if it went up AND down, though. I agree. Consider the whole Ketogenic diet and perhaps intermittent fasting. I’m working on that myself now. But I can’t vouch for its effectiveness. I will report in a post whether or not it’s successful. I don’t like doctors or dentists either, but I deal with it on an as-needed basis.

I think the first thing you should work on is your energy level. Research that and see what you can find. Hope things improve for you soon.
All best, Denise

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